The Anatomy.Monotony Career Path of Edy Poppy

Edy Poppy is a former model who has always been a writer waiting for discovery. Now that she has put modelling aside, she can focus all her efforts on entertaining us in another form of art…writing. Anatomy.Monotony tells the story of a couple who have rather uncommon ideals about fidelity. 

The transition from model to author…

I’ve always been a writer that also modelled, never a model that started writing. Already as a young girl growing up on a farm in a small Norwegian town, I wrote poems, short stories, and fairy tales. The stories kept me from dying of boredom in this place where nothing ever happened. In literature, everything can always happen. It was a way to survive, so to speak. Or as the American writer Joan Didion puts it, “We tell ourselves stories in order to live”. Writing was me, whereas modelling happened to me. Longing for experiences, I moved to London in 1998, at the height of Cool Britannia. After a week in this city I sat in front of two photographers by chance in a bar, they asked if they could photograph me, and that was the start of it. What I loved the most about modelling was how each photographer could change the way I looked by the way they looked at me. As if the photographers had written me.

The age limit for models…

One of my goals as a writer is to challenge and open up what beauty can be. Vår, the main character of my novel Anatomy. Monotony., has her own ways of finding beauty in the world, and most of the time it’s connected to people’s flaws. What one doesn’t like in oneself is often what makes one unique! Beauty-surgery, for instance, seems to edit out the amazing oddity in people. I feel a responsibility as a writer to challenge that narrow, stereotyped vision, which is no vision at all. Language can define what beauty is or can be. The word mole has a very different feel to it than the word beauty-spot. The latter makes the first become beautiful. Words are not only descriptions of reality they also create it. When it comes to the idea of age limit for models, I think only death should be the limit. Every age has its own beauty. Ugliness often appears when you try to go against that process, rather than embracing it, re-inventing it, making it cool!

On giving Lou and Vår, the main characters of her book a happy ever after ending…

When I read fairy tales as a young girl, I always hated the “happily ever after”-part of the story. Because then there is nothing more to the story to tell. It’s the end, even if the characters are at the beginning of everything. In the fairy tale Cinderella, for example, we only know about her struggle to get the prince, but nothing about her life with him, it’s masked by the happy end, even if it’s probably very interesting. With Vår and Lou, there is no “happily ever after” in that sense. Life continues. And life is a beautiful struggle.

See more in our March 2018 ‘Woman I Feel, I See You’